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IWSG March 2017

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Question of the Month for IWSG: Have you ever pulled out a really old story and reworked it? Did it work out?

On the first Wednesday of each month, hundreds of bloggers join together to share our insecurities and offer encouragement to one another as we pursue the art of writing. You can learn more about it by visiting the founder Alex J. Cavanaugh, or the website for the Insecure Writers Support Group.

The IWSG has started posting a question for the month as well (see above). My answer is no, I have not pulled out anything that is “really old” to rework. It’s dead in the file/drawer. I did, however, rework my submission for last year’s anthology contest, which I did not win, and used it for my youth theater workshops. It turned out to be a great set-up for some creative writing and theater making with the kids. I’ll be using something similar for the session I’m teaching this spring. It helped me create outside my normal genre and comfort zone. 

Beyond that, my insecurities come from a bit of envy at the people who write plays and have them produced by “real” theater companies. How do they do it? What connections did they need to have/make to get their worked noticed? I did not apply for Fringe Fest this year. I’d really like to do something locally again. And, I need to get focused and put it on the calendar. Seriously. I need a deadline/goal, or it won’t happen. 

Go. Create. Inspire!

Journaling Prompt: What’s the best month to produce a play? When do you feel the most adventurous in your art?

  1. We shouldn’t compare ourselves to other writers, we all find our own way to where we want to be.
    I did a quick Google search – I have no idea about the whole writing for theatre bit – and saw an article in the Guardian about how to make your submission stand out. (Writing for theatre? Be practical.) I also saw an article on Writers Write about how to get your play produced by various companies. Here’s the link:
    http://www.writerswrite.com/journal/mar98/youve-finished-writing-the-play-now-what-part-ii-3985
    Looks a lot like the submission process for a novel…
    Good luck with your writing.

  2. That’s cool it worked well as workshop for the kids.
    Here’s a dumb answer for you regarding connections – sometimes it pays just to ask. (I recently stepped way out of my league and asked someone to do a guest post for the IWSG and it blew my mind when he said yes.)

  3. I’m glad you were able to rework your production for your youth theatre group. Not being a theatre writer, I can’t help you with your problem or get your writing to the right people, but I think the general consensus with writing is to just keep on keeping on. Eventually, if you work hard enough and long enough and put yourself out there, you’ll get seen. Hopefully, anyway. You are probably on the right track sharing these concerns with IWSG; there’s possibly somebody in the group who can help you, if they see your blog. 🙂 Best of luck.

  4. It’s so crazy how things work out perfectly for some people, and not for others. It’s one part luck, and one part connections, eh? Here’s hoping the day will come when luck smacks you in the face. Theater is such a hard business.

  5. Hey Mary,

    Have you tried networking with those people who are getting their plays produced? From my experience, playwrights are incredibly inclusive and helpful, even more so than other types of writers. I’m sure one would be willing to mentor you, or there must be groups of playwrights you could join in your area.

    If you’re not having any luck, let me know. I have a playwright friend who is incredibly successful. I’m sure he’d be willing to answer some questions and/or point you in the right direction.

    Good luck!

  6. I’ve rewritten one change up concept and gone back to old story and concept, which I think is funny. This happened a couple times after I let it sit awhile then went back and read both version.

    Happy IWSG Day!
    Juneta @ Writer’s Gambit

  7. What a great use of your short story!

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